Injuries

Six simple exercises for shoulder pain

Shoulder pain is a common problem affecting more than a third of all adults at some point. There are a number of reasons why your shoulder may become painful and most of these will improve by:

  • Staying active with gentle movements of your shoulder
  • Taking painkillers to allow you to move
  • Trying simple exercises

Isometric exercises are exercises where a muscle contracts but the joint it works on does not move. These could also be called static contractions. Isometric exercises have been shown to reduce pain for a number of conditions and are a good starting point for simple shoulder pain.

Exercises provided courtesy of rehabmypatient.com our exercise programme partner.

It is normal for these exercises to feel uncomfortable or mildly painful but do not push into severe pain.

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1. Pendulum

Lean over holding on to a chair or table, let your arm hang down by your side, and swing your arm gently in circles. Try to let momentum and gravity move your arm. Go anti-clockwise and clockwise. This exercise is a great way to passively mobilise a stiff shoulder.

Hold for 2-3

Video: http://youtu.be/YYvl59eU78M

 

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2. Isometric shoulder flexion wall

Stand facing a wall. Decide If you wish to use a bent arm, or a straight arm. It does not really matter which you choose. Push your arm in front of you, into the wall. This will cause a contraction of the shoulder muscles. Hold the contraction, and relax. Repeat as required.

Perform 3-5s times daily | Repeat 6-8 times | Hold for 2-3

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3. Isometric shoulder abduction wall

Stand with your side to a wall. Push your arm away from your body into the wall. This will cause a contraction of the shoulder muscles. Hold the contraction, and relax. Repeat as required.

Perform 3-5s times daily | Repeat 6-8 times | Hold for 2-3

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4. Isometric shoulder adduction wall

Stand with your side to a wall. Push your arm inwards across your chest, into the wall. You can also use the side of a door frame for this exercise. This will cause a contraction of the shoulder muscles. Hold the contraction, and relax. Repeat as required.

Perform 3-5s times daily | Repeat 6-8 times | Hold for 2-3

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5. Isometric shoulder internal rotation wall

Stand with your side to a wall or a door frame. Tuck your elbow into your body. Push your arm inwards across your chest, into the wall. Keep your elbow tucked in to your side as you perform the movement. This will cause a contraction of the shoulder muscles. Hold the contraction, and relax. Repeat as required.

Perform 3-5s times daily | Repeat 6-8 times | Hold for 2-3

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6. Isometric shoulder external rotation wall

Stand with your side to a wall or a door frame. Tuck your elbow into your body. Push your arm outwards away from your body, into the wall. Keep your elbow tucked in to your side as you perform the movement. This will cause a contraction of the shoulder muscles. Hold the contraction, and relax. Repeat as required.

Perform 3-5s times daily | Repeat 6-8 times | Hold for 2-3

If your shoulder pain is not improving and you would like an assessment or if just want advice on specific exercises then please get in touch on 01236 425661, email at admin@jmcphysiocures.co.uk or contact us on social media.

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Injuries

Returning to sport: how to balance injury prevention and performance

Returning to sport after injury can be a daunting process. There is never a perfect time and especially after a prolonged period of time injured it can be difficult to know when you are truly ready. It is important to adapt your training regimes during a return to sport to help reduce the risk of flare-up and chronic injury before returning to your normal routine. I don’t make any claims of being an expert in this field and every person is different, but there are a few general things worth considering when returning to sport.

Injury prevention vs performance:

If you are returning to sport after a muscle/tendon/joint injury and have been attending physio, then (hopefully) you will have been gradually increasing the amount of resistance or load by exercising. Injury prevention generally focuses on slow, controlled movements possibly with low repetitions and high resistance. While this is helpful in your rehabilitation and can help you to feel strong again most sports require high speed specific movements with low resistance.

It is therefore important that when you begin to return to sport that sport-specific training forms the last part of your rehab. This could be as simple as kicking a football, having a bounce match of badminton, going to the driving range or just running. Ask your physio about any drills that you could do which will help with your injury but are also targeted at your sport.

Injury prevention plans have been shown to have some benefit particularly when tailored to individual sports such as FIFA 11+ programme for football players.

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How hard is too hard?

The first stage of this is finding out what your limits are and then setting a baseline level or normal. Training sessions should be based around this and are generally advised to be at between 80-120% of normal. It is important to bear in mind when returning after an injury this is your current normal and not your pre-injury normal!

High loads or quick increases in load of 150% of normal can place you in the “danger zone” for injury and should be kept to a minimum, only used around competition times for example. Likewise exercising at too low a level such as 50% of your capability doesn’t adequately strengthen your muscles or prepare you for a normal session. Light sessions should be used for recovery sessions with a sensible balanced plan of intense work, rest and rehab work.

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How much to increase it?

Although the answer to this question would be different for every person a relatively safe rule of thumb would be to increase the amount of exercise by 10% per week. While this can make return to your previous level a laborious process and may be too slow for some people it has been shown to reduce flare-ups.

When returning to competitive sports it is also worth spending some time returning to training only before a full return. This is especially important for any team contact sports where you have to consider other people and a naturally competitive instinct which might encourage you to push harder than planned.

Make sure you are mentally and physically ready!

The psychological aspect of return to sport is often undervalued particularly if the injury happened on the field of play. Fully trusting your body to do what you will ask it can be a difficult process and Sports Psychologists are the real experts in this.

From a Physiotherapy perspective one way to help with mental readiness is to be confident in your physical ability. A rough set of targets which are specific to you are worth setting such as for a footballer to be able to:

  • Run 5-10Km
  • Sprint 20-30yards x5-10 with changes of direction
  • Hop/Jump/Land in multiple directions – (making sure that both legs are relatively equal)
  • Strike a ball full force pain-free
  • Tackle

If your targets consider, the physical demands of your sport and you know your body can meet these without any problem then hopefully you are ready to get back to normal.

 

Pilates

What is Pilates and how can it benefit you?

Try telling it to the Scottish weather, but spring has indeed sprung. With us already in April, perhaps you’re continuing to endeavor with a New Year’s resolution you’d made in  January? Or maybe the new season has you in the mood to try something new?

Let us introduce you to Pilates. We’ll explain what exactly it is, why it can be of significant benefit to you, and how you can even join classes here with us at JMC Physiocures.

What is Pilates?

Pilates is a form of low impact exercise which focuses on building core strength and stability and spinal mobility through exercises performed in any postural position: sitting, standing, or lying. It is sometimes done with equipment such as resistance bands, Pilates rings and small weights. The exercises are designed to incorporate the breath and improve your body’s awareness.

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Pilates origins

Pilates was created by Josef Pilates, who ahead of his time thought that liftestyle, bad postures and inefficient breathing were causes of bad health, much of which can be said of today’s lifestyles.

Pilates developed an exercise program initially called “Contrology” to utilise the mind for muscle control, particularly the postural muscles.

Click the link below to see an original Pilates exercise “The Boomerang”:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhE8fbZQ4xI

As you can imagine….not commonly practiced now!

Who is Pilates for?

Pilates exercises can be made harder or easier depending on individual requirements, therefore it is all inclusive. There are some exercises with certain contraindications, however a qualified instructor will know your history and avoid or adapt these exercises. Most classes are performed on floor mats, therefore good mobility up/down to the floor is required. Individuals with severe osteoporosis, acute herniated disc and unstable blood pressure may not be recommended.

If you are in doubt of your suitability contact us on admin@jmcphysiocures.co.uk and our physio and Pilates Instructor Lisa will be able to advise you.

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Benefits of Pilates

  • With today’s lifestyles we’re either sitting hunched over a desk or driving, carrying heavy bags or tools, or head in our phones and iPad’s, therefore Pilates is designed to help improve your posture.
  • Muscle strength – Pilates works by challenging slings of muscles, after any good workout you will be sore or tender, this is called DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness) and is completely normal. After some time 8-12 weeks or sooner you’ll notice a difference in your strength and possibly muscle tone too.
  • Body awareness and flexibility – Pilates exercises, no matter the position, are performed in neutral spine position, everyone’s neutral is different, so it’s about learning how your body moves and working on improving any imbalances you may have. Once you have more awareness you’ll see new habits creep in to your daily life such as sitting more comfortably at work, utilising your core for carrying those tools or shopping bags. Along with this benefit, the exercises work on spinal and joint mobility, through stretching and segmental spinal movement (moving each vertebrae and reducing stiffness).
  • Wellbeing and stress reduction – As life can be pretty busy, it’s nice to take some time for yourself and focus on you! With Pilates there is a lot to think about, technique is KEY when performing the exercises; you can switch off from the world focus on your exercises, relax and more importantly have fun!

Pilates class tips:

  • Size – ensure your class is small, if you’re in a large class of say 20+ people, that’s a lot for the instructor to keep an eye on, to correct or improve technique. By the time the instructor has gone round you all – your muscles will be burning and your technique may have wandered. Besides who likes to be sardined in next to some stranger doing exercises!
  • Feedback – feedback from your instructor is key, that’s why you’re there. If you’re completely new to Pilates you may feel your instructor is regularly correcting your position, this is for your benefit, stick with it YOU WILL GET THERE!
  • 1:1’s – these are of great benefit before you start your Pilates classes. The instructor will chat to you about Pilates and your goals, assess your movement and control, run through the Pilates starting positions and some exercises to ensure you’re good to go when you start your class.

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Pilates at JMC Physiocures:

At JMC Physiocures we offer clinical Pilates, these sessions are led by our Physio Lisa. Classes are small max 10 per class and everyone attends for an hour 1:1 session with Lisa prior to starting. Here, Lisa can get to know your goals, your history and guide you through the Pilates start up positions, followed by a 30-minute class. Don’t worry about remembering these new positions and exercises as they’ll be sent out to you to practice prior to the beginning of classes.

Our beginner block in Hamilton runs on a Wednesday between 5.30pm and 6.30pm at Whitehill Neighbourhood Centre. We also offer beginner’s blocks in Airdrie on a Thursday between 11:30am and 12:30pm.

Cost of the block is £90, this includes your initial 1 hour 1:1 session and six weekly classes. Should you wish to continue various blocks are available (£8 per class), to keep class sizes small we currently do no operate a pay-as-you-go policy.

We do run a later, and more advanced, class on a Wednesday night in Hamilton at 6.30pm – 7.30pm, however this is currently at capacity.

If you’re keen or would like more info please contact our admin team on admin@jmcphysiocures.co.uk or Lisa directly on lisa@jmcphysiocures.co.uk